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If someone had told Cyrena Burns a year ago that she would be living in a brand-new, beautiful, two-bedroom duplex by the end of 2019, she would have shaken her head or laughed at them. It was around that time that she had started thinking to herself, “I am never going to stop having bad luck.”

Then, last June, she was taking a friend to work and saw a sign for Prairie View Estates. At the time, she did not have any idea if the new development coming to the north end of Ottawa would be in her budget. She just knew she had to at least try. When she discovered that there were affordable, income-based units available, she let herself begin to believe that just maybe her luck would soon be turning.

Twenty-six years earlier, Cyrena had moved from Overland Park to Ottawa with her husband and two children. In her eyes she had it all–a beautiful home, healthy kids, and a husband with whom she was still in love. Then, after 23 years of marriage and while on deployment, her husband decided he no longer wanted to be married to her. Having recently left a secure job in order to spend more time at home with her son before he graduated from high school, Cyrena began suffering from depression.

This was the beginning of Cyrena’s education on the lack of safe, clean and affordable housing, a combination she didn’t think she would likely be able to ever have again. When the rent on her safe and clean apartment was raised five years ago, she had to move and could only afford a house with floors so soft she thought she was going to fall through. On day two in what she dubbed  “the house from hell”, sewage began backing up into the tub and then later, covering the entire first floor. She knew she couldn’t stay. She was eventually let out of her lease and, with no other affordable options available, had to move in with her mom and sleep on her couch. Sometimes, in order to give herself and her mom some personal space, Cyrena would opt to sleep in her car.

She felt desperate.

It was during that state of desperation, that Cyrena noticed the sign for Prairie View Estates, which was being built and developed by the Prairie Fire Development Group in Kansas City, made possible through low income housing tax credits awarded through the Kansas Housing Resource Corporation. On a whim, she called. Having never been on any type of housing assistance, she didn’t fully know what affordable housing really was, but quickly learned she would not need to be on housing assistance to qualify for an affordable unit. “There have definitely been some misconceptions around town. The chatter was that this was just going to be a place filled with drug addicts, but that could not be further from the truth. The people living here are the most giving and kind people. This town has needed a place like this for a long time.”

After being one of the first residents to move into Prairie View last month, Cyrena believes her luck has turned around. She has a home that is not only safe and clean, but she also has an attached garage and wide doors that allow her to easily access every room in her home while using her walker. “This is my start-over,” she said. “I can do this on my own. I can afford my rent, plus enough for groceries. I know I won’t fall because the floors are warped. I know there will be air conditioning. The layout is perfect. They thought of everything. Having my own personal space means the world to me. I feel like I have my dignity back.”

A self-supporting, nonprofit, public corporation, Kansas Housing helps Kansans access the safe, affordable housing they need and the dignity they deserve. For more information about our work, please visit our website.

Alissa Ice
Alissa Ice

TOPEKA – Alissa Ice will lead the state of Kansas’ housing development efforts, collaborating with developers and stakeholders to expand affordable housing throughout the state, Executive Director Ryan Vincent announced. As Director of Housing Development, Ice will manage the state’s Low Income Housing Tax Credit and Moderate Income Housing programs, as well as the Private Activity Bond allocation.

“Expanding Kansans’ access to quality, affordable housing is the central focus of our work,” Vincent said. “Developing housing that serves our state’s most vulnerable citizens is a key component of that access. Alissa’s programmatic knowledge and leadership experience make her an excellent Housing Development leader, and we’re so pleased to welcome her to our team.”

Ice brings more than a decade of housing experience to her new role, including 12 years at the Missouri Housing Development Commission, where she worked with the state’s housing trust fund, the National Housing Trust Fund, and the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program. She previously served as the City of Lawrence’s Housing Administrator, collaborating with the city’s new housing trust fund and the Affordable Housing Advisory Board to meet the city’s affordable housing goals.

A Kansas native, Ice was born and raised in Newton and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Social Welfare from the University of Kansas and a Master’s of Public Administration from the University of Missouri – Kansas City. She lives in Overland Park with her husband and two daughters.

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A self-supporting, nonprofit, public corporation, Kansas Housing helps Kansans access the safe, affordable housing they need and the dignity they deserve. For more information about the corporation’s housing development initiatives, please contact director Alissa Ice at aice@kshousingcorp.org or visit our website.

MIH Photo
House on tree-lined corner street.
Former elementary school site converted to single-family homes in Pittsburg, Kansas.

Thirteen Kansas communities will receive a combined total of $2.3 million to develop affordable housing for moderate-income families. The funding, made possible through the state of Kansas’ Moderate Income Housing (MIH) program and supplemental Kansas Housing funding, awards grants or loans to develop multi-family rental units, single family homes, and water, sewer, and street extensions in cities or counties with populations of fewer than 60,000.

“Since 2012, the Kansas Legislature has recognized the need for quality, affordable housing for those who do not qualify for federal housing assistance, yet cannot afford market rate housing,” Kansas Housing Executive Director Ryan Vincent said. “From workforce housing serving the agriculture industry in western Kansas, to repurposing an abandoned elementary school block into affordable single-family homes in southeast Kansas, we’ve seen countless examples of how the program has addressed housing shortages in rural communities across the state. This year MIH applications doubled, demonstrating the ongoing need for this crucial assistance.”

This year’s awards will help rehabilitate a vacant long-term care facility into affordable rental units in Osage City, help develop a five-unit subdivision for single family homes in Sedgwick, and will help expand a homebuyer assistance program in Lyons. See full details for all 13 awards.
Kansas Housing administers the MIH program at no cost to the state. The Legislature allocates funding on a pass-through basis, and Kansas Housing manages the application and award process.

The MIH program is the state’s sole housing appropriation from the Kansas Legislature. With a 2019 MIH budget of $2 million, Kansas currently allocates roughly $.69 per citizen to housing.

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A self-supporting, nonprofit, public corporation, Kansas Housing helps Kansans access the safe, affordable housing they need and the dignity they deserve. For more information about the Moderate Income Housing program, please contact Program Director Alissa Ice or visit our website.

Weatherization professional adding insulation to home's exterior siding

Governor Laura Kelly joined with Kansas Housing Resources Corporation to proclaim October 30 Weatherization Day in Kansas. The Weatherization Assistance Program, signed into law by President Gerald Ford in 1976, has weatherized more than 7.4 million homes, reducing household utility bills, lowering energy usage, and creating healthier and more comfortable home environments.

KHRC provides free weatherization assistance to qualifying families. Learn more.

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Income Guidelines

Household Size Maximum Income for Weatherization (200% of FPL)
1  $  24,980
2  $  33,820
3  $  42,660
4  $  51,500
5  $  60,340
6  $  69,180
7  $  78,020
8  $  86,860
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